Near at hand

These are the books I keep near at hand.  Rilke's "Book of Hours," because he gives words to an understanding of transcendent reality  “I am circling around God, around the ancient tower, and I have been circling for a thousand years, and I still don't know if I am a falcon, or a storm, or a great song.”  Brueggemann's "The Prophetic Imagination" because he keeps me in mind of the "royal consciousness committed to achievable satiation" (read the methodologies of the 1%) and the contrast of the cross, "the assurance that effective prophetic criticism is done not by an outsider but always by one who must embrace the grief, enter into the death, and know the pain of the criticized one."  Verna Dozier's "The Dream of God," in which she writes  "I believe that the genius of Christianity is not creed or institution, but the vision of a new possibility for human life rooted in an ancient understanding of God, and articulated and lived out by a Nazarene carpenter from that tradition."  And Wendell Berry.  Which book to choose?  "Given" I suppose because it is about what we have and might be grateful for.  When we convene again  to understand the world,  the first speaker will again  point silently out the window  at the hillside in its season,  sunlit, under the snow,  and we will nod silently,  and silently stand and go.

These are the books I keep near at hand.

Rilke's "Book of Hours," because he gives words to an understanding of transcendent reality

“I am circling around God, around the ancient tower, and I have been circling for a thousand years, and I still don't know if I am a falcon, or a storm, or a great song.”

Brueggemann's "The Prophetic Imagination" because he keeps me in mind of the "royal consciousness committed to achievable satiation" (read the methodologies of the 1%) and the contrast of the cross, "the assurance that effective prophetic criticism is done not by an outsider but always by one who must embrace the grief, enter into the death, and know the pain of the criticized one."

Verna Dozier's "The Dream of God," in which she writes

"I believe that the genius of Christianity is not creed or institution, but the vision of a new possibility for human life rooted in an ancient understanding of God, and articulated and lived out by a Nazarene carpenter from that tradition."

And Wendell Berry.  Which book to choose?  "Given" I suppose because it is about what we have and might be grateful for.

When we convene again

to understand the world,

the first speaker will again

point silently out the window

at the hillside in its season,

sunlit, under the snow,

and we will nod silently,

and silently stand and go.